Cakes

Buttery Vanilla Bundt Cake

vanilla bundt cake with vases of dahlias surrounding it.
vanilla bundt cake with bundt cake pans stacked behind it

This post is sponsored by Nordic Ware, a valued partner of The Vanilla Bean Blog. We’re also hosting a giveaway together on my Instagram channel for a $250 shopping spree to Nordicware.com, a copy of my new cookbook, Baking for the Holidays, and a Nordic Ware anniversary braided Bundt pan. Restrictions due apply.

This Bundt cake is a wonderful recipe from Baking for the Holidays, my third cookbook that was just released.

I’ve been making Bundt cakes since I started my baking career 20+ years ago, and this particular cake evolved from a variety of sources, including bakeries I worked in and decades of making Bundt cakes in my own kitchen. This is why you’ll find it titled the “Everything Bundt Cake” in my cookbook, as it has a bit of everything in terms of flavor profile and techniques from all of the recipes I worked with.

Sour cream adds a slight tang here, and a little canola oil keeps the cake moist over several days. I prefer this cake on the second and third days; the flavor develops and the crumb is tender and perfectly buttery.

The cake is lovely on its own, with a simple powdered sugar dusting on top, but you could also finish with chocolate glaze, or lemon glaze.

sliced bundt cake on a sheet pan

Baking with a Bundt Pan

Over the last decade of making Bundt cakes, I’ve come to rely on Nordic Ware for almost all my baking pans; their Bundt pans are not only beautiful, but durable and well-made, and they create an even cake-bake.

A few years ago I was invited to the Nordic Ware factory and was able to see how Bundt cakes were made. I love that their pans are not only made here in America, but also in Minnesota, and that they are a family run business. If you get a chance to check out their Factory Store (located in St. Louis Park, MN), I highly recommend it!

Buttery Vanilla Bundt Cake on parchment
vanilla bundt cake on wire rack

For recipe testing in my book, I used their 16 cup ProForm Heavyweight Angel Food and Pound Cake Pan (which is a dream to work with). As well as their 75th Anniversary Braided Bundt Pan that I’ve used in this post, which is absolutely gorgeous. In honor of their 75th Anniversary, the Minneapolis’ family-owned company made this exclusive pan with an intricately woven design, commemorating community, togetherness, and collaboration over the years. 

The braided Bundt pan holds 12 cups (batter amount is still the same for the recipe) and turned out the most gorgeous cake that released perfectly.

Worried about sticking?
Nordic Ware Bundt pans are made of cast aluminum which is superior for baking, and the nonstick surface means clean release and easy cleaning. One of the many reasons I swear by their pans!

vanilla bundt cake sliced, on parchment

More Bundt Cake Recipes:

sliced bundt cake on a sheet pan

Buttery Vanilla Bundt Cake

Servings: 8 servings
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour
A delicious vanilla bundt cake with the best texture. Sour cream adds a slight tang, and a little canola oil keeps the cake moist over several days. I prefer this cake on the second and third days; the flavor develops and the crumb is tender and perfectly buttery.
Sarah Kieffer
3.73 from 11 votes
Print Pin Rate

Ingredients

  • 3 cups [426 g] all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 cup [120 g] sour cream at room temperature
  • 1/2 cup [120 g] whole milk at room temperature
  • 1 1/4 cups [2 1/2 sticks or 283 g] unsalted butter at room temperature, plus more for greasing the pan
  • 3 cups [600 g] granulated sugar
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons salt
  • 6 large eggs at room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract

Instructions

  • Adjust an oven rack to the middle position and preheat the oven to 350°F [180°C]. Generously grease a 10 in [25 cm] tube or Bundt pan*. In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour and baking soda.
  • In a medium bowl or liquid measuring cup, whisk together the sour cream and whole milk until combined.
  • In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle, beat the butter on medium speed until creamy, about 1 minute. Add the sugar and salt and beat on medium speed until very light and fluffy, 4 to 6 minutes.
  • Scrape down the sides of the bowl and add the eggs one at a time, beating on medium speed until incorporated and stopping to scrape down the sides of the bowl after each addition. Add the canola oil and vanilla and mix on low speed to combine. Add half of the flour mixture and mix on low speed until combined. Add the sour cream mixture and mix on low speed until combined. Scrape down the sides of the bowl, add the remaining flour mixture, and mix on low speed until combined. Increase the speed to medium and beat for 15 to 20 seconds.
  • Pour the batter into the prepared pan and use a spatula to even out the top. Bake for 50 to 65 minutes, until a wooden skewer or toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean.
  • Transfer the pan to a wire rack and gently run a knife around the edge of the cake to loosen it. Let cool for 20 minutes in the pan, then invert the cake onto the rack and remove the pan to finish cooling. The cake can be wrapped in plastic wrap and kept at room temperature for 2 days, or refrigerated for up to 4 days.

Notes

Greasing a Bundt pan:
  • Use baking spray with flour or melted shortening — not butter. The milk solids in butter can lead to sticking. 
  • Use a pastry brush to grease your Bundt pan to get into all the nooks and crannies, including the tube.
  • Reply
    Gina DeMarco
    Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 12:43 pm

    1 star
    Since my first comment was deleted, let me add this…
    I have a 12c NordicWare bundt pan, and I attempted to make this recipe. Not only did it overflow, it started a small fire on the bottom of the oven from the drippings. Thank God I have the baking soda on the counter, so I took some and threw it on the small fire. I have NEVER, EVER experienced anything like this in my 40+ years of baking.
    I’m so glad that my husband was here (and not at work), to help me clean my oven.
    So disappointed in the waste of ingredients, and time to attempt to make this and clean up the oven.

    • Reply
      Sarah Kieffer
      Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 1:24 pm

      Hi Gina – I do see your other comment on the post; I didn’t delete it. The recipe in the book calls for a 10 in [25 cm] tube – this is larger than a 12 cup Bundt pan. For this post I did use the 12 cup, and had no problem with it leaking – it baked up right to the top. Is it possible you added too much baking soda (the recipe does only call for 1/2 teaspoon). That could cause the batter to overflow. I’m so sorry you had trouble. -Sarah

      • Reply
        Gina
        Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 3:05 pm

        1 star
        I am sorry, I do see my first comment.
        I followed this exactly as written.
        I have never had a problem like this before.

        • Reply
          Sarah Kieffer
          Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 4:07 pm

          Can I ask a few more questions to help troubleshoot this? I have made this bundt cake dozens upon dozens of times and tested the recipe many times in the 12-cup before publishing the recipe (Nordic Ware also made the recipe, too, to make sure it worked in their pans since it was a sponsored post). Did you use a scale to measure the ingredients? What kind of all-purpose flour did you use? And what specific Bundt pan from Nordic Ware did you use? Again, I’m sorry this happened to your oven; I’m perplexed at what caused it.

          • Sarah Kieffer
            Friday, July 15, 2022 at 11:53 am

            Hi Gina – Your follow-up comment ended up on someone else’s comment below, so I am posting again here. I think it might have been the flour. White Lily is a lower protein flour – almost a cake flour, and it is bleached slightly different than all-purpose flours. Lower protein flours do not absorb liquid the same as higher protein flours (such as Gold Medal Flour). This Bundt cake has a lot more liquid than a regular Bundt cake recipe, so that flour might have not been able to absorb the excess liquid the same rate while it rose. I did find a baking thread in “cake central” where other bakers mentioned their bundt cakes exploding in the oven (as yours did) when they didn’t add the extra 2 tbsp of flour per cup to their cakes (as White Lily recommends on their package). You can find that here: https://www.cakecentral.com/forum/t/674067/white-lily-flour. I live in Minnesota and we do not have White Lily readily available in the North – I know a lot of Southern bakers use it! I’ve had to troubleshoot recipes with a few bakers who use it faithfully because it can make some recipes turn out differently than a regular all-purpose flour. It does make cakes lighter because of the low protein, but sometimes doesn’t work cup for cup in recipes with a lot of liquid. Again, sorry about the disaster in your oven, and I hope you have a lovely weekend.

          • Gina DeMarco
            Friday, July 15, 2022 at 2:44 pm

            5 stars
            Oh wow! I never knew that!! This was the first time using this particular flour. I usually use gold medal ap flour.
            Wow! I’m speechless.
            Thank you very much for all of your help and feedback.
            I’ll buy the gold medal ap flour next week when I get paid and attempt to make it again ??

  • Reply
    Gina
    Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 12:03 pm

    3 stars
    This is in the oven as I’m writing this. I have a 12c. Bundt pan and it is overflowing. I smelled something burning and it is on the bottom of the oven..

  • Reply
    liz
    Thursday, October 21, 2021 at 2:19 pm

    if you are lacking in shortening or baking spray, what do you recommend for greasing a pan? would a cooking oil, with flour, suffice?

    • Reply
      Gina
      Friday, July 15, 2022 at 7:31 am

      1 star
      I, too, have made numerous bundt cakes. I have the same Nordic ware pan as you do in your pictures. I’m not able to send you a picture of the one I have.
      I use Lily White (or is it white lily) AP flour.
      No, I didn’t use a scale,I never do.

      • Reply
        Sarah Kieffer
        Friday, July 15, 2022 at 8:11 am

        Hi Gina – I think it might have been the flour. White Lily is a lower protein flour – almost a cake flour, and it is bleached slightly different than all-purpose flours. Lower protein flours do not absorb liquid the same as higher protein flours (such as Gold Medal Flour). This Bundt cake has a lot more liquid than a regular Bundt cake recipe, so that flour might have not been able to absorb the excess liquid the same rate while it rose. I did find a baking thread in “cake central” where other bakers mentioned their bundt cakes exploding in the oven (as yours did) when they didn’t add the extra 2 tbsp of flour per cup to their cakes (as White Lily recommends on their package). You can find that here: https://www.cakecentral.com/forum/t/674067/white-lily-flour. I live in Minnesota and we do not have White Lily readily available in the North – I know a lot of Southern bakers use it! I’ve had to troubleshoot recipes with a few bakers who use it faithfully because it can make some recipes turn out differently than a regular all-purpose flour. It does make cakes lighter because of the low protein, but sometimes doesn’t work cup for cup in recipes with a lot of liquid. Again, sorry about the disaster in your oven, and I hope you have a lovely weekend.

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